State Snow Loads

Additional information and links for State Snow Load Requirements. If you have additional information you would like to see added to this list please feel free to contact us.

Alabama
Use IBC 2009 0 psf - 10 psf with case study areas at higher elevations

Alaska
Use IBC 2009 25 psf - 300 psf
See IBC Table 1608.2 for ground snow loads for alaskan locations.
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State of Alaska has given authority to local building officials for determining required snow Loads for their municipalities.

Arizona
Use IBC 2009 0 psf - 15 psf with case study areas
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Building codes are locally adopted and administered. Some jurisdictions have adopted the Snow Load Data for Arizona, a publication by the Structural Engineers Association of Arizona (Elliott, 1973 and 1981). Contact local building official for determining required snow loads.
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The Structural Engineers Association of Arizona is currently reviewing a new snow load study by Scott Freestone (2006) that is currently available at www.seaoa.org.
In addition, you can use our interactive Arizona Ground Snow Loads map (Freestone, 2006) for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Arizona.

Arkansas
Coming Soon...

California
The State of California is still a work in progress however, you can use our interactive Nevada County Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the Town of Truckee and/or Nevada County, CA.

Colorado
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Connecticut
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Delaware
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District of Columbia
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Florida
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Georgia
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Hawaii
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Idaho
In 1986 Dr. Ronald L. Sack and Azim Sheikh-Taheri (Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of Idaho) published the Ground and Roof Snow Loads for Idaho, after several years of nonfunded work. The methodology for obtaining ground snow loads for Idaho was obtained using a more extensive database than the ground snow loads shown in Fig. 7-1 of the ASCE 7-10. The snow load study and accompanying map are currently the most accurate method for obtaining ground snow load values for the State of Idaho. A PDF copy of the snow load study and a high resolution image of the map may be purchased from the University of Idaho Library for $25.00 by sending an email to dbecker@uidaho.edu.
In addition, you can use our interactive Idaho Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Idaho.

Illinois
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Indiana
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Iowa
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Kansas
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Kentucky
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Louisiana
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Maine
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Maryland
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Massachusetts
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the 2009 IBC (Figure 1608.2) and the 2009 IRC (Figure R301.2(5), Table R301.2(1) and Table R301.2(5).) with the 8th Edition Massachusetts Building Code, which replaces the national snow load map with state specific tabulated values by jurisdiction.
In addition, you can use our interactive Massachusetts Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Massachusetts.

Michigan
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the 2009 IBC (Figure 1608.2) and the 2009 IRC (Figure R301.2(5), Table R301.2(1) and Table R301.2(5).) with the 2009 Michigan Building Code, which replaces the national snow load map with a state specific zone map and tabulated values by jurisdiction.
In addition, you can use our interactive Michigan Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Michigan.

Minnesota
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the 2006 IBC (Chapter 1608.2) and the 2006 IRC (Figure R301.2(5) and Table R301.2(1).) with the 2007 Minnesota State Building Code (Ch. 1303.1700), which states that,
The ground snow load, Pg, to be used in determining the design snow loads for buildings and other structures shall be 60 pounds per square foot in the following counties: Aitkin, Becker, Beltrami, Carlton, Cass, Clearwater, Cook, Crow Wing, Hubbard, Itasca, Kanabec, Kittson, Koochiching, Lake, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Norman, Otter Tail, Pennington, Pine, Polk, Red Lake, Roseau, St. Louis, Todd, and Wadena. The ground snow load, Pg, to be used in determining the design snow loads for buildings and other structures shall be 50 pounds per square foot in all other counties.
A ground snow load zone map is provided on page 26 of this publication.
In addition, you can use our interactive Minnesota Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Minnesota.

Mississippi
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Missouri
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Montana
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the IBC (Chapter 16) with the Administrative Rules of Montana (24.301.146), which states that,
The minimum design roof load after allowed reductions shall be 30 psf, even if the current code or design practice allows for reductions below a 30 psf design load.
For areas outside of certified city, county and town jurisdiction ground snow load information can be obtained by inputing the correct latitude and longitude using the Montana Ground Snow Load Finder.
In addition, you can use our interactive Montana Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Montana.

Nebraska
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Nevada
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New Hampshire
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the 2009 IBC (Chapter 1608.2) and the 2009 IRC (Table R301.2(1).) with the New Hampshire State Building Code (BCR 303, Sec. 12, 1608.2.1), which states that,
Ground snowloads are permitted to be determined in accordance with Table 1 of Ground Snow Loads for New Hampshire ERDC/CRREL TR-02-6.
Case studies have been performed for all cities, towns and unincorprated townships in the state, and are available in the publication Ground Snow Loads for New Hampshire, US Army Corps of Engineers, ERDC/CRREL TR-02-6. The New Hampshire State Building Code Amendments permit use of this document for determining ground snow loads throughout the state. Elevations above 2,500 ft. still require site-specific case studies to determine ground snow loads.
In addition, you can use our interactive New Hampshire Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of New Hampshire.

New Jersey
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New Mexico
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New York
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the IBC (Chapter 16) with the 2010 Building Code of New York State, which states that,
The ground snow loads to be used in determining the design snow loads for roofs shall be determined in accordance with ASCE 7 or Figure 1608.2. When using Figure 1608.2 for sites at elevations above 1,000 feet (304 m), the ground snow load shall be increased from the mapped value by 2 psf (0.095 kN/m2) for every 100 feet (30 480 mm) above 1,000 feet (304 m). Site-specific case studies may be made in lieu of snow loads in Figure 1608.2 or ASCE 7. Ground snow load determination for site-specific case studies shall be approved and shall be based on an extreme value statistical analysis of data available in the vicinity of the site using a value with a 2-percent annual probability of being exceeded (50-year mean recurrence interval.
Design snow loads shall be determined in accordance with Chapter 7 of ASCE 7, but the design roof load shall not be less than that determined by Section 1607.
In addition, you can use our interactive New York Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of New York.

North Carolina
For all commercial and residential structures use the ground snow load values from the IBC 2012, IRC 2012 or ASCE 7-10, as per the 2012 North Carolina Building Code.
Numbers in parentheses represent the upper elevation limits in feet for the ground snow loads presented. Site-specific case studies are required to establish ground snow loads at elevations not covered.
The North Carolina Building Code has also created a specific zone map that is essentially equivalent to the the ASCE ground snow load map and may be used as an alternative.

North Dakota
For all commercial and residential structures use the ground snow load values from the IBC 2012, IRC 2012 or ASCE 7-10, as per the 2014 North Dakota State Building Code.
CS regions require site specific case studies to establish ground snow loads.

Ohio
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Oklahoma
Use IBC 2009 5 psf - 20 psf

Oregon
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the IBC (Chapter 16) and the IRC (Section R301.6) with the BCD Oregon Specialty Codes, which states that,
The minimum design roof snow load of 20 psf x I (Importance Factor) has been established for all structures in the State of Oregon. This minimum loading shall be applicable to the balanced load case only. The minimum load shall not be reduced for slope or any other conversion factor and is only modified where applicable by a rain-on-snow surcharge. Furthermore, the balanced load case shall not be less than the minimum loading regardless of the value determined by other methods.
The Oregon Building Codes Division with the Structural Engineers of Oregon (SEAO) has created an online Snow Load Map with Map Usage Notes.
In addition, you can use our interactive Oregon Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Oregon.

Pennsylvania
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Rhode Island
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South Carolina
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South Dakota
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Tennessee
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Texas
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Utah
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the IBC (Chapter 16) and the IRC (Section R301.6) with the State Construction and Fire Code Act (Title 15A Chapter 3 Section 107, Section 202).
In addition, you can use our interactive Utah Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Utah.

Vermont
The State has amended the snow load requirements of the 2012 IBC (Chapter 1608.2) with the Vermont 2012 Fire & Building Safety Code (Sec. 5 and Annex VII), which states that,
The total roof snow load, including additional loading effects due to drifting snow, sliding snow, unbalanced loading conditions and partial loading conditions, shall not be less than 40 psf for roofs with a slope less than or equal to 5 degrees, and shall not be less than the slope factor (Cs) times 40 psf for roofs with a slope greater than 5 degrees.
This minimum roof snow load shall not apply to the windward side for unbalanced loading conditions, or to the partially loaded spans for partial loading conditions.
A ground snow load zone map is provided as Annex VII on page 48 of this publication.
In addition, you can use our interactive Vermont Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Vermont.

Virginia
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Washington
In 1995 the Structural Engineers Assocation of Washington, published the second edition of the SEAW Snow Load Analysis for Washington. The second edition is a 1995 update of the original 1975 publication, with a practical understanding of snow load design for buildings and structures, including an in-depth commentary on the intent of the then current UBC provisions.
This edition provides a large color map for each half of the state, with normalized ground snow load isolines and elevation contours to help readily determine the ground snow load anywhere in the state. Cities, towns, counties, roads and various bodies of water are shown to provide convenient reference.
Also included are various sample problems, tabulation of recommended ground snow loads for many cities and towns, and tabulation of the actual snow information that was available at the time of publication.
The Snow Load Analysis for Washington may be purchased from the SEAW for $35.00 at www.seaw.org or call 206-682-6026.
In addition, you can use our interactive Washington Ground Snow Loads map for determining the ground snow load for any location in the State of Washington.

West Virginia
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Wisconsin
For all commercial buildings and structures use the ground snow load values from the IBC 2009 or ASCE 7-05.
The State of Wisconsin has not adopted the International Residential Code (IRC) for residential structures. Residential design is governed by the Uniform Dwelling Code (UDC) of Wisconsin as given by the Wisconsin Administrative Code SPS 321. Sub-chapter II of this code states that,
Roofs shall be designed and constructed to support the minimum snow loads listed on the zone map. The loads shall be assumed to act vertically over the roof area projected upon a horizontal plane>
In addition, you can use our interactive Wisconsin Roof Snow Loads map for determining the minimum roof design snow load for any location in the State of Wisconsin (residential design only).

Wyoming
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